Look to Canada.

Canadian oil sands project.

The world is in an energy crisis.

Global energy demand is rising — and so are prices. Renewable energy alone is not able to meet the world’s energy needs. And oil and gas is in increasingly short supply — due to war, and to politics.

Canada can help meet the demand with reliable, responsibly produced oil and gas, for export to European nations and beyond. Canada’s oil and gas industry is committed to emissions reduction.

Not all oil and gas is created equal. Many of the world’s top oil and gas producing countries — like Russia, Saudi Arabia, Iraq and Qatar — have poor records on the environment, governance, and social standards.

So if you’re not getting your oil and gas from a responsible, reliable producer like Canada, where are you getting it from?

Canadian oil sands project.

Canada’s oil and gas sector is committed to lowering emissions.

Unlike many other oil and gas-producing countries, Canada takes its environmental responsibility seriously. Canada’s industry spends about $1 billion per year on cleantech research and development, and is a proven leader in carbon capture and storage (CCS), a critical technology for reducing emissions. Canada’s liquefied natural gas (LNG) will have among the world’s lowest emissions. And Canada’s oil sands is the only major oil basin where producers have jointly committed to reach net zero emissions by 2050.

Source: BMO Capital Markets
Source: BMO Capital Markets

Where are you getting your oil and gas from?

Russia is one of the world’s largest oil and gas suppliers. In 2021, countries imported more than 7.5 million barrels per day of Russian oil and oil products, and more than 680 million cubic metres per day of Russian natural gas.

But times have changed. Russia is no longer a viable trading partner. Importing more oil and gas from a stable supply like Canada would improve the world’s energy security — and help reduce emissions — in the long run.

The complete transition to alternative and renewable energy is decades away.

Today, only 12% of the world’s energy supply is met by renewable energy. Meanwhile over 53% of energy supply is met by oil and gas. Although the supply of renewable and alternative energy is expected to grow over the next 30 years, overall demand for energy is expected to grow even more. As the world gradually transitions to a more diverse energy mix, oil and gas will continue to remain critical.

Canadian Oil Sands Worker Walking Through Constructed Wetland Reclamation Project
Canadian Oil Sands Worker Walking Through Constructed Wetland Reclamation Project

Canada can meet the world’s energy needs.

Canada is one of the world’s largest producers of oil and natural gas, and leads the world in environmental protection and social standards.

The world needs reliable, affordable, responsibly produced oil and gas now, and will long into the future on the path to decarbonization.

So as the world continues to need oil and gas for decades to come, where will you get yours from?

Look to Canada.

For a reliable trading partner. For energy security. For a commitment to reducing emissions. And for responsibly produced oil and gas.

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